School districts move to ease teacher stress, burnout (2022)

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School districts move to ease teacher stress, burnout

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CORRECTS INSTRUCTORS NAME TO EMILY DANIELS FROM EMILY RILEY Instructor Emily Daniels, left, raises her arms while leading a workshop helping teachers find a balance in their curriculum while coping with stress and burnout in the classroom, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Concord, N.H. School districts around the country are starting to invest in programs aimed at address the mental health of teachers. Faced with a shortage of educators and widespread discontentment with the job, districts are hiring more therapist, holding trainings on self-care and setting up system to better respond to a teacher encountering anxiety and stress.

  • Charles Krupa - staff, AP
(Video) SEL for Teachers: Understanding Stress and Burnout

Teachers and guidance counselors tap wooden sticks during a rhythm exercise during a workshop helping teachers find a balance in their curriculum while coping with stress and burnout in the classroom, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Concord, N.H. School districts around the country are starting to invest in programs aimed at address the mental health of teachers. Faced with a shortage of educators and widespread discontentment with the job, districts are hiring more therapist, holding trainings on self-care and setting up system to better respond to a teacher encountering anxiety and stress.

  • Charles Krupa - staff, AP

Teachers trace the lead line while sketching during a sensory motor therapy exercise at a workshop helping teachers find a balance in their curriculum while coping with stress and burnout in the classroom, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Concord, N.H. School districts around the country are starting to invest in programs aimed at address the mental health of teachers. Faced with a shortage of educators and widespread discontentment with the job, districts are hiring more therapist, holding trainings on self-care and setting up system to better respond to a teacher encountering anxiety and stress.

  • Charles Krupa - staff, AP

Kathleen Connor, left, a school counselor at Newfound Area School District, pairs up and talks with Jennifer Martin, a Portsmouth, N.H. third grade teacher, during an exercise that mimics chatting while driving in a car during a workshop helping teachers find a balance in their curriculum while coping with stress in the classroom, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Concord, N.H. After two and a half years of online school, COVID protocols, students' behavioral challenges and political upheaval, teachers' mental health is suffering.

  • Charles Krupa - staff, AP

Teachers launch a ball from a small parachute during a workshop helping teachers find a balance in their curriculum while coping with stress and burnout in the classroom, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Concord, N.H. School districts around the country are starting to invest in programs aimed at address the mental health of teachers. Faced with a shortage of educators and widespread discontentment with the job, districts are hiring more therapist, holding trainings on self-care and setting up system to better respond to a teacher encountering anxiety and stress.

  • Charles Krupa - staff, AP
(Video) Reducing Special Educator Stress and Burnout

Teachers follow each other in a circle during a workshop helping teachers find a balance in their curriculum while coping with stress and burnout in the classroom, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Concord, N.H. School districts around the country are starting to invest in programs aimed at address the mental health of teachers. Faced with a shortage of educators and widespread discontentment with the job, districts are hiring more therapist, holding trainings on self-care and setting up system to better respond to a teacher encountering anxiety and stress.

  • Charles Krupa - staff, AP

Teachers touch hands as they join in a circle during a workshop helping to find a balance in their curriculum while coping with stress and burnout in the classroom, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Concord, N.H. School districts around the country are starting to invest in programs aimed at address the mental health of teachers. Faced with a shortage of educators and widespread discontentment with the job, districts are hiring more therapist, holding trainings on self-care and setting up system to better respond to a teacher encountering anxiety and stress.

  • Charles Krupa - staff, AP
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By MICHAEL CASEY - Associated Press

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — With Prince’s “Raspberry Beret” blaring in the background, about 20 New Hampshire educators grabbed wooden sticks and began pounding their tables to the beat.

Emily Daniels, who was leading a two-day workshop on burnout, encouraged the group including teachers, school counselors, occupational therapists and social workers to stand up inside a hotel conference room. Before long, the group was banging on walls and whatever else they could find. Laughter filled the air. A few started dancing.

“Rhythm making offers the body a different kind of predictability that you can do every single day,” said Daniels, a former school counselor who created The Regulated Classroom which trains teachers on how to manage their own nervous system and, in turn, reduce stress in the classroom.

The training session is part of a growing and, some would say, long overdue effort to address the strains on educators' mental health.

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Addressing the mental health challenges of students coming out of the pandemic has emerged as a priority for schools nationwide. Many districts, facing hiring challenges, see tending to the educators as a way to help them help students and to retain them, amid stressors that range from behavioral problems to fears of shootings.

School districts have provided increased mental health training for staff, classroom support as well as resources and systems aimed at identifying burned out teachers and getting instructors connected to help.

Karen Bowden-Gurley, a fifth grade teacher, said she attended the New Hampshire training because of teacher burnout, but she also feels student burnout.

“The demands on all of us were really high and we were trying to make up for lost time for the couple of years that they fell back on their curriculum. But we forgot that they haven’t been in school for a couple of years so they missed that social-emotional piece. We are dealing with that in the classroom.”

In a survey by the Rand Corporation, twice as many principals and teachers reported frequent job-related stress as other working adults. A study from a coalition of mental health organizations of New Orleans found educators working during the pandemic reported rates of emotional distress similar to health care workers — 36% screened positive for anxiety, 35% for depression and 19% for post-traumatic stress syndrome.

“It’s all pretty bad,” said Leigh McLean, the primary investigator at the Teacher Emotions, Characteristics, and Health Lab at the University of Delaware School of Education, who has found levels of depression, anxiety and emotional exhaustion among elementary school teachers that are 100% to 400% higher than before the pandemic.

She saw those issues increasing the most among early career teachers and teachers of color.

“So it seems like the patterns among teachers are mirroring inequities that we’re seeing in the general population with underrepresented groups being hit the hardest, which is really unfortunate,” she said.

Some districts have or are planning to invest federal COVID-19 relief money in teacher mental health, seeing it as a way to also improve the classroom environment, boost retention and ultimately benefit the students themselves. Among the states singling out teacher mental health as priorities are Nebraska and Pennsylvania.

The Atlanta school district launched a service with Emory University using federal funds to provide mental health services. Dubbed Urgent Behavioral Health Response, it funds 11 clinicians from Emory who provide emotional and behavioral assistance during school hours for struggling school employees.

A Delaware district, meanwhile, hired two social and emotional learning coaches who work to address problems teachers are having in the classroom.

(Video) "Guest teacher" program set to help address CMS teacher burnout

“If you can imagine a teacher has a classroom where students are engaged, they are helping each other and there is a positive supportive culture, their job satisfaction is likely to be higher,” Jon Cooper, the director of the Colonial School District’s health and wellness division. “They are less likely to leave the profession, and in turn, that supports their well being.”

Houston, which started building calming rooms where students can go to decompress, is hoping to do the same for teachers, according to Sean Ricks, the Houston Independent School District’s senior manager of crisis intervention, noting that he has seen a “significant rise in teachers that were in distress.”

The rooms would be different from the traditional teacher break rooms and a place where teachers could go during time off to “calm down and chill out,” Ricks said, adding they could have “could have some aromatherapy, maybe some soft music.”

“We want them to be able to understand that we have to take mindfulness breaks and self-care breaks during the academic day sometimes,” Ricks said.

An elementary school in Indiana starts the week with Mindful Mondays, where teachers guide their classes in deep breathing techniques. There are also Thoughtful Thursdays, where a student is called on to write a letter to a staff member to show appreciation, and Friday Focus, when students and teachers talk about self-care.

“My teachers know when they need to take breaks throughout the day I want them to take those breaks,” said Allison Allen-Lenzo, the principal at O’Bannon Elementary School.

A growing number of groups offer training that incorporates breathing exercises, yoga, gentle movements and meditation.

One of these is Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education or CARE. In studies of its use among 224 New York City teachers, researchers found statistically significant improvements including reductions in emotional psychological distress, stress that comes from not having enough time as well as improvements in quality classroom interactions. Researchers also found that it extended to the students who showed increased engagement.

“Your stress level can rise without you even realizing it because your attention is so outwardly directed at everything else that’s going on around you,” said Tish Jennings, a University of Virginia education professor who led the team that developed CARE and was the lead researcher studying the program. “So what these practices do is build the capacity to be more aware of how you’re feeling at any given moment, so that you can be proactive.”

Back in New Hampshire, the educators pushed aside the tables and were mastering a series of stretching movements known as qigong. Then, they gathered in a circle for an exercise that aims to synchronizing their nervous system. Known as collective rhythm making, they began clapping their hands and snapping their fingers in unison.

The educators at The Regulated Classroom training believe these new tools — though on first glance a little unorthodox — invigorated them. Bowden-Gurley felt they allowed her to “train her brain to think differently” and planned to use them in the classroom to build a better sense of community and more confidence with her students.

Kelly Hurd, a kindergarten teacher, said the training gave her a sense of what is possible going into the new school year.

“I love teaching and I love the kids but it’s also hard,” Hurd, who experienced burnout before the pandemic and was part of the New Hampshire training, said. “The pandemic was so hard and so impactful and so stressful. I feel a sense of renewal and excitement and I do feel like I’ve been given permission to have more fun and focus on joy in school.”

Associated Press writer Jocelyn Gecker in San Francisco contributed to this report.

For more back-to-school coverage, visit: https://apnews.com/hub/back-to-school.

The Associated Press education team receives support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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(Video) Valley districts rolling out stipends, incentives to prevent teacher burnout

FAQs

How do teachers recover from burnout? ›

Teacher burnout: how to recover from teaching-related stress
  1. Common signs of teacher burnout: Irritability and exhaustion. ...
  2. Ask for support. ...
  3. Take mental health days. ...
  4. Leave schoolwork at school. ...
  5. Consider a change in career direction.

What can schools do to prevent burnout? ›

How to Prevent Burnout in School
  • Make Time for Enjoyable Activities: ...
  • Get Plenty of Physical Exercise: ...
  • Get Outside: ...
  • Make Time for Social Activities: ...
  • Develop Good Relationships with Professors: ...
  • Set Reasonable Goals: ...
  • Avoid Procrastination: ...
  • Get Better at Time Management:

How do I push through my teacher burnout? ›

8 Realistic ways to prevent and recover from teacher burnout
  1. Talk about teacher burnout. ...
  2. Practice self-care. ...
  3. Know when to take a break. ...
  4. Plan for community. ...
  5. Find out what actually went wrong. ...
  6. Put things in perspective. ...
  7. Try something new. ...
  8. Ask for help when you need it.
5 May 2020

Why has teaching become so stressful? ›

Teachers work longer hours than many other positions, which often leads to burnout and stress. Some of the many contributing factors are lack of resources, work-life balance and political issues. Teachers are losing what little time they have for planning due to sub shortages, which is stretching them thin.

How many years does the average teacher teach? ›

Years of teaching experience and grade level taughtTotalRural
Distant
Average number of years14.314.0
Years of teaching experience
Total100.0100.0
34 more rows

How can teachers be less stressful? ›

Try these out, and be sure to let us know what works best for you in the comments!
  1. Breathe (properly) The classroom can cause sensory overload. ...
  2. Embrace the stress. ...
  3. Be imperfect. ...
  4. Practice emotional first aid. ...
  5. Be grateful. ...
  6. Limit “grass is greener” thinking. ...
  7. Work smarter, not harder. ...
  8. Ask for help.

How can teacher attrition be prevented? ›

Proven Strategies for Increasing Teacher Retention Rates
  1. Cultivate Collaboration. Even in a classroom full of students, teachers can still feel very much alone. ...
  2. Empower Teachers to Succeed. ...
  3. Provide Them with Support. ...
  4. Create Better Work Conditions.

Why do teachers get burnout? ›

Teaching is a rewarding yet demanding career. With long hours and a heavy workload, it's easy to fall prey to teacher burnout. Without proper support, teachers are in danger of being overworked and not taking care of their own mental and physical health needs.

What is the average burnout rate for teachers? ›

A new Gallup poll shows that 44% of K-12 employees say they “always” or “very often” feel burned out at work, including 52% of teachers who report the same.

How long does it take to recover from teacher burnout? ›

Research shows that this seldom works as burnout symptoms usually re-emerge within 2-3 weeks of returning to work.

What percentage of teachers quit in the first 5 years? ›

44% of teachers quit in the first five years.

And they don't just quit their current positions - they often leave teaching altogether. This is a much higher rate than most other occupations in the U.S., including those known for high burnout rates, such as police officers.

Why are teachers so overworked? ›

Many teachers say they are so burned out by the pandemic, overworked because of staff shortages, and fed up with low pay and a lack of respect, they're ready to quit.

Is teaching the most stressful job? ›

Today, teaching is one of the most stressful occupations in the U.S. High levels of stress are affecting teacher health and well-being, causing teacher burnout, lack of engagement, job dissatisfaction, poor performance, and some of the highest turnover rates ever.

What is the most stressful jobs in the world? ›

For the third year in a row, enlisted military personnel, firefighter, airline pilot, and police officer are the four most stressful occupations, according to CareerCast's annual Most Stressful Jobs report.

What do teachers struggle with the most? ›

10 Challenges Of Teaching & How To Overcome Them
  • Lack of funding. ...
  • Lack of effective communication. ...
  • Being encouraging and motivating under challenging times. ...
  • Disciplining students. ...
  • Endless paperwork & extended working hours. ...
  • Time Management. ...
  • Pressure from school administrators. ...
  • Burn out.

At what age do most teachers retire? ›

According to Education Next, teachers retire, on average, at around the age of 58. AARP reports that 33 percent of all beginning teachers leave the teaching profession within three years of beginning their careers, but the majority of teachers continue teaching and can reap retirement benefits later in life.

How do I know if I should quit teaching? ›

5 Warning Signs It's Time To Quit Teaching
  • Teaching leaves you more exhausted than it leaves you energized/excited.
  • Your personal life is suffering due to the stress of the position.
  • You are certain that switching grades, schools, or districts will not help you.

What percent of teachers have a master's degree? ›

Percentage distribution of public school teachers, by highest degree earned and state: 2017–18
StateLess than a bachelor's degreeMaster's degree
Alaska3.747.5
Arizona4.539.2
Arkansas3.843.9
California2.343.2
64 more rows

What are the five stress management techniques? ›

Manage how you live with these five tips to feel less stressed:
  • Use guided meditation. Guided meditation is a great way to distract yourself from the stress of day-to-day life. ...
  • Practice deep breathing. ...
  • Maintain physical exercise and good nutrition. ...
  • Manage social media time. ...
  • Connect with others.
10 Dec 2018

How do you overcome teacher frustration? ›

Try to put your teacher frustration in perspective by focusing on the things you really like about your job. Work with colleagues to try to resolve some of the issues that are causing your frustration in the first place. Then, if you still feel like venting, call your mom.

What is the most influential factor affecting teachers decisions to leave? ›

Five main factors were found to influence teachers' decisions to leave: workload, new challenge, the school situation, salary and personal circumstances. Of these, workload was by far the most important, and salary the least.

What is the turnover rate for teachers? ›

In the US, for example, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) found that every year, 8% of teachers leave their profession early, and another 8% move to a different school, giving a total turnover rate of 16%. But this 16% is just a snapshot of the average across school districts.

What causes teacher retention? ›

Compensation

The first and most obvious factor in retaining quality educators is pay. Providing compensation packages competitive with those of neighboring districts as well as other occupations requiring similar levels of education allows for all schools to have a good shot at keeping their best teachers.

Why are teachers so tired all the time? ›

One of the reasons that teachers feel so worn out is because of decision fatigue. Research has found that teachers make more minute-by-minute decisions than brain surgeons, and that's extremely tiring.

What are the most common causes of teacher stress burnout? ›

It occurs after prolonged exposure to poorly managed emotional and interpersonal job stress.
  • Consequences of Teacher Burnout. ...
  • Poor Funding. ...
  • High Emotional Demands. ...
  • Inadequate Preparation. ...
  • Challenging Teaching Situations. ...
  • Teacher Burnout's Disproportionate Impact on High-Poverty Schools. ...
  • Constant Fatigue. ...
  • Self-Doubt.
16 Feb 2021

Are teachers really overworked? ›

The shortage of people entering the field of education predates the pandemic—which of course has only made things worse. Record numbers of teachers across the U.S. feel overworked and burned out, and every day, their students see it.

What professions have the highest burnout rate? ›

Industries with the highest employee burnout rate worldwide 2019. In 2019, hotel, food services and hospitality was the industry with the highest burnout rate worldwide.

Are more teachers leaving the profession? ›

The National Center for Education Statistics says 44% of public schools will report teaching vacancies at the start of this year and more than half of those were from resignations with 1000s of teaching vacancies across the country, the nation appears to be reckoning with an exodus of educators.

Are teachers part of the great resignation? ›

Teachers found a competitive edge during the Great Resignation, taking to TikTok to share their stories of finding more flexible and better paying work.

Can you come back from burnout? ›

Despite the grip that burnout has over so many of us, recovery is possible. While there's no quick fix to burnout, there are many ways to alleviate stress levels and return to a healthier state of being. Here are 14 different tips on recovering from burnout that you can easily incorporate into your daily routine.

What are the four stages of burnout? ›

  • Four Stages for the Ages.
  • First Stage. The first stage is a warning – yellow light caution: ...
  • Second Stage. The second stage I call Doubt and Shame. ...
  • Third Stage. At long last, you've had it with being uncertain. ...
  • Fourth Stage. As you know well; burnout can be one hell of a shell. ...
  • Closing Moral. Breaking out of a burnout hell.

How do you know if you are burnt out from teaching? ›

Here are some commonly experienced symptoms that indicate when stress has turned to burnout.
  • Exhaustion. ...
  • Depression. ...
  • Withdrawal. ...
  • Physical symptoms. ...
  • Lack of time. ...
  • Lack of resources. ...
  • High demands. ...
  • District and state mandates.
21 Nov 2021

How can teachers improve mental health? ›

Ten mental health and well-being tips for teachers
  1. Set aside time to unwind. ...
  2. Plan ahead. ...
  3. Set boundaries. ...
  4. Get vaccinated. ...
  5. Adjust your expectations. ...
  6. Acquire new skills and appreciate the ones you already have. ...
  7. Be kind to yourself. ...
  8. Stay socially connected.
31 Aug 2021

How do you simplify as a teacher? ›

6 Tips to Simplify your Teaching
  1. Simplify your schedule. One of the first things you can do as a teacher is to look at your daily schedule. ...
  2. Plan ahead to simplify your year. ...
  3. Have a concise and simplified behavior program. ...
  4. Simplify your classroom systems. ...
  5. Simplify your workspace. ...
  6. Simplify your jobs.

How do teachers maintain mental health? ›

10 Teacher Mental Health Tips You Can Put Into Practice Today
  1. Control the Controllable During COVID-19 & Beyond.
  2. Carve Out Time for Self-Care to Maintain Your Mental Health.
  3. Get Your Body Moving to Help Your Mental Wellness.
  4. Model Self-compassion.
  5. Set Reasonable Expectations (for yourself and others)

What jobs do teachers leave teaching for? ›

For example, if you're an English teacher, the transition to a freelance writer could be a logical career move.
  • Childcare Worker. ...
  • Sales Representative. ...
  • Financial Advisor. ...
  • Freelance Writer. ...
  • Corporate Trainer. ...
  • Tour Guide. ...
  • Human Resource Specialist. ...
  • Digital Marketer.
5 May 2022

Is the first year of teaching the hardest? ›

While being an educator is never without its struggles, the first year is by far the most challenging — pieced together with idealism, confusion, good intentions, excitement, fear, and expectations.

What percentage of teachers have a second job? ›

In a 2021 national survey of 1,200 classroom teachers conducted by the Teacher Salary Project, a nonpartisan organization, 82% of respondents said they either currently or previously had taken on multiple jobs to make ends meet.

Why is teaching becoming too stressful? ›

Teachers work longer hours than many other positions, which often leads to burnout and stress. Some of the many contributing factors are lack of resources, work-life balance and political issues. Teachers are losing what little time they have for planning due to sub shortages, which is stretching them thin.

How long does the average teacher last? ›

Years of teaching experience and grade level taughtTotalSuburban
Midsize
Average number of years14.214.1
Years of teaching experience
Total100.0100.0
34 more rows

What percentage of teachers are happy? ›

About 60% of teachers are happy with their careers.

While many teachers say they find their work fulfilling and are generally happy with their work environments, many are dissatisfied with their salaries. With only 28% saying they rated their pay at either four or five out of five stars.

How can a teacher get through the last month of school? ›

6 Helpful Tips to Help you Conquer the Last Month of School
  1. Take care of YOU first! This first tip is ALL ABOUT YOU. ...
  2. Theme days! ...
  3. Enlist their help! ...
  4. Take a vote! ...
  5. Reflect on your year together! ...
  6. Create a memory book!

How do I survive the last 2 weeks of school? ›

25 Tricks to Get Your Students Through the Last Weeks of School
  1. Make some new rules. ...
  2. Take an extra recess. ...
  3. Set a weekly goal. ...
  4. Set a daily goal. ...
  5. Try a new behavior system. ...
  6. Start each day with inspiration. ...
  7. Stttttttrrrrreeeeetttttcccchhhhh. ...
  8. Read a book about summer.
5 May 2016

What does teacher burnout feel like? ›

Psychology Today describes burnout as "a state of chronic stress that leads to physical and emotional exhaustion, cynicism, detachment, and feelings of ineffectiveness and lack of accomplishment." Teachers are usually high achievers who like to work hard and are always looking for ways to improve.

How do you let go as a teacher? ›

In order to let go, you must practice surrender and the art of imperfection. Try to let go of your preconceived notions of the perfect lesson plan, the perfect classroom and the perfect teacher. Surrender to the day and tell yourself the rest can wait until tomorrow. And ASK FOR HELP.

What is the burnout rate for teachers? ›

A new Gallup poll shows that 44% of K-12 employees say they “always” or “very often” feel burned out at work, including 52% of teachers who report the same.

Why are teachers so tired all the time? ›

One of the reasons that teachers feel so worn out is because of decision fatigue. Research has found that teachers make more minute-by-minute decisions than brain surgeons, and that's extremely tiring.

What are the most common causes of teacher stress burnout? ›

It occurs after prolonged exposure to poorly managed emotional and interpersonal job stress.
  • Consequences of Teacher Burnout. ...
  • Poor Funding. ...
  • High Emotional Demands. ...
  • Inadequate Preparation. ...
  • Challenging Teaching Situations. ...
  • Teacher Burnout's Disproportionate Impact on High-Poverty Schools. ...
  • Constant Fatigue. ...
  • Self-Doubt.
16 Feb 2021

Can burnout be permanent? ›

Burnout will never go away on its own. We're quick to dismiss mental disorders and feelings because they aren't immediately visible like a broken leg might be–but ignoring them can be just as painful. The more you ignore burnout, the greater the risks in the future. Remember: You don't have to get better in a day.

Does it take years to recover from burnout? ›

Once a phase of stress or overwork has turned into burnout, it takes at least 11 weeks to recover from it. For most people, recovery from burnout takes anywhere from a year to several years. An active approach can help shorten this time as much as possible and alleviate common symptoms.

How do teachers let go of control? ›

Letting Go of Control
  1. Model Positivity.
  2. Get Acquainted.
  3. Make It Social.
  4. Reflect and Celebrate.
  5. Ask for Help.
  6. Don't Take it Personally.
  7. Gaining Community.
1 Nov 2018

How do you accept and let go? ›

How to Let Go of Things from the Past
  1. Create a positive mantra to counter the painful thoughts. ...
  2. Create physical distance. ...
  3. Do your own work. ...
  4. Practice mindfulness. ...
  5. Be gentle with yourself. ...
  6. Allow the negative emotions to flow. ...
  7. Accept that the other person may not apologize. ...
  8. Engage in self-care.

Why do good teachers quit? ›

Perhaps the biggest reason why teachers quit is stress and burnout. While the ongoing pandemic has certainly added more stress on teacher's plates, stress is nothing new. In one study conducted prior to the pandemic, 23% of teachers reported their work as always being stressful.

What percentage of teachers quit in the first 5 years? ›

44% of teachers quit in the first five years.

And they don't just quit their current positions - they often leave teaching altogether. This is a much higher rate than most other occupations in the U.S., including those known for high burnout rates, such as police officers.

Why are teacher leaving the profession? ›

Across the nation, teachers are leaving the profession. The pandemic and shifting political landscape have left teachers feeling overworked and undervalued. According to a 2022 Gallup poll, K-12 teachers report the highest burnout rate of all U.S. professions.

Videos

1. How the U.S. plans to address educational inequities, teacher burnout and school shootings
(PBS NewsHour)
2. Teacher Stress: A Crisis Ignored | Lisa Sanetti | TEDxUConn
(TEDx Talks)
3. Burnout and pandemic stress cause some teachers to walk away
(NJ Spotlight News)
4. SPP 115: Four School Psychologist Burnout Traps and How to Avoid Them
(School Psyched Podcast)
5. SEL for Teachers: Teacher Stress and Burnout (WPTO)
(Broadcast Educational Media Commission)
6. Mindfulness and stress reduction for teachers
(Nasco Education)

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